Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

This page is dedicated to answering the most commonly asked questions for you.

What is Chinese Medicine?

Chinese medicine is currently the second most practiced medical system in the world and millions of Australian’s utilise it each year.

According to historic texts, those who understood the laws of nature and who lived, ate and drank in accordance within these natural laws maintained good health and a peaceful mind.

While those that live outside of these laws, who seek immediate gratification, overindulge in food, drinks and overwork their bodies would decline in health by age 50.

Chinese philosophy long held the view that good health is a result of a harmonious relationship between the human body and the external environment. However as societies became more complex and more stressful, physicians developed a system of medicine that could diagnose and restore the lost balance between human and environment.

Today’s epidemic of chronic ill health and disease is not due to a lack of good science or medicine. Instead, many times it comes from a lack awareness between our body and nature.

Apply for a free 15 minute consultation here.

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What type of conditions can acupuncture help with?

The World Health Organization (WHO) confirms that the following diseases and disorders that can be treated with acupuncture. The diseases or disorders for which acupuncture have been tested in controlled clinical trials reported in recent literature can be classified into three categories.

Diseases, symptoms or conditions in which acupuncture has been proven through controlled trials to be an effective treatment:

  • Adverse reactions to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy
  • Allergic rhinitis (including hay fever)
  • Biliary colic
  • Depression (incl. depressive neurosis and depression following stroke)
  • Dysentery, acute bacillary
  • Dysmenorrhoea, primary
  • Epigastralgia, acute (in peptic ulcer, acute and chronic gastritis, and gastrospasm)
  • Facial pain (including craniomandibular disorders)
  • Headache
  • Hypertension, essential
  • Hypotension, primary
  • Induction of labour
  • Knee pain
  • Leukopenia
  • Low back pain
  • Malposition of fetus, correction of
  • Morning sickness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Neck pain
  • Pain in dentistry (including dental pain and temporomandibular dysfunction)
  • Periarthritis of shoulder
  • Postoperative pain
  • Renal colic
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Sciatica
  • Sprain
  • Stroke
  • Tennis elbow

Diseases, symptoms or conditions for which the therapeutic effect of acupuncture has been shown but for which further proof is needed:

  • Abdominal pain (in acute gastroenteritis or due to gastrointestinal spasm)
  • Acne vulgaris
  • Alcohol dependence and detoxification
  • Bell’s palsy
  • Bronchial asthma
  • Cancer pain
  • Cardiac neurosis
  • Cholecystitis, chronic, with acute exacerbation
  • Cholelithiasis
  • Competition stress syndrome
  • Craniocerebral injury, closed
  • Diabetes mellitus, non-insulin-dependent
  • Earache
  • Epidemic haemorrhagic fever
  • Epistaxis, simple (without generalized or local disease)
  • Eye pain due to subconjunctival injection
  • Female infertility
  • Facial spasm
  • Female urethral syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia and fasciitis
  • Gastrokinetic disturbance
  • Gouty arthritis
  • Hepatitis B virus carrier status
  • Herpes zoster (human (alpha) herpesvirus 3)
  • Hyperlipaemia
  • Hypo-ovarianism
  • Insomnia
  • Labour pain
  • Lactation, deficiency
  • Male sexual dysfunction, non-organic
  • Ménière disease
  • Neuralgia, post-herpetic
  • Neurodermatitis
  • Obesity
  • Opium, cocaine and heroin dependence
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Pain due to endoscopic examination
  • Pain in thromboangiitis obliterans
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (Stein–Leventhal syndrome)
  • Postextubation in children
  • Postoperative convalescence
  • Premenstrual syndrome
  • Prostatitis, chronic
  • Pruritus
  • Radicular and pseudoradicular pain syndrome
  • Raynaud syndrome, primary
  • Recurrent lower urinary-tract infection
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
  • Retention of urine, traumatic
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sialism, drug-induced
  • Sjögren syndrome
  • Sore throat (including tonsillitis)
  • Spine pain, acute
  • Stiff neck
  • Temporomandibular joint dysfunction
  • Tietze syndrome
  • Tobacco dependence
  • Ulcerative colitis, chronic
  • Urolithiasis
  • Vascular dementia
  • Whooping cough (pertussis)

Diseases, symptoms or conditions for which there are only individual controlled trials reporting therapeutic effects, but for which acupuncture is worth trying because treatment by conventional and other therapies is difficult:

  • Chloasma
  • Choroidopathy, central serous
  • Colour blindness
  • Deafness
  • Hypophrenia
  • Irritable colon syndrome
  • Neuropathic bladder in spinal cord injury
  • Pulmonary heart disease, chronic
  • Small airway obstruction

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Have other people benefited from David's programs?

Due to the national guidelines for primary health professionals, David is not allowed to promote patient testimonials regarding the hundreds of patients he has helped with Acupuncture and Chinese medicine.

Read some of the experiences people have had in David’s Personal Training program.

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How long does one session take?

Your initial assessment will take 20minutes. Depending on your plan, herbal medicine appointments are 15-30 minutes, acupuncture 45 minutes and Personal training sessions are 30-60 minutes.

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Is Chinese Herbal Medicine safe?

David is a registered herbalist and is licensed to practice and dispense herbal medicine in Australia. All herbal medicines David uses are listed and regulated by the Australian Government Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for quality and safety.

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Is Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine covered with private heath insurance?

Yes, Acupuncture and Chinese medicine are covered by over 40 private health funds. If you have private health insurance you can get immediate reimbursement by paying through our HICAPS machine. Alternatively we will issue you a receipt that you can submit a claim with your insurer. The rebated amount will depend on your insurer and the type of cover you have.

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Will I benefit in this program if my condition is not urgent?

Chinese medicine is designed to help you live the longest and the most vital life possible. Its focus not just only disease but wellness and preventative medicine.

If your body has subtle imbalances, these can be picked up by Chinese medical diagnosis. Chinese medicine is often referred to as preventative medicine because it has the powerful ability to resolve early stage imbalances when your condition isn’t yet urgent.

Therefore don’t wait until your condition gives you so much discomfort that you have no choice but to revert to more invasive procedures. You can keep your body fine tuned with Chinese medicine.

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Is Chinese Medicine safe for Children?

Yes, Chinese medicine is safe for children as long as you are following advice from a licensed practitioner. Dosages and herb choices are modified according to the age and condition of the child.

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Is Dry Needling the same as Acupuncture?

It’s common for physiotherapists, chiropractors and medical doctors to provide dry needling. This uses needles in and around areas of pain. GP’s sometimes use the term medical acupuncture.

In this scenario practitioners may spend one weekend learning basic theory and have limited practice using the needles before trying it on patients.

Acupuncturist’s however spend up to 5 years studying and complete over 1000 clinical hours before opening practice.

The difference between dry needling and acupuncture is that  acupuncture provides instant pain relief once the needles are inserted and can support multiple acute and chronic conditions.

Dry needling is limited to pain conditions.

In regard to treating pain, during acupuncture – needles are inserted at distal points that are not on the painful area itself.

These points can be translated as “neural nodes” or “Jie” in Chinese and stimulation of these nodes influence the central and peripheral nervous system.

This can be explained with a simply analogy…

When you turn on/off a light bulb, you don’t go to the bulb itself. Instead you use the switch. You can’t see where the cables runs and the switch is far from the actual light, but you use the switch to turn the light bulb on and off.

This is the same as acupuncture, by using the switch (distal points) you can turn off the pain response and turn on the healing response.

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Is Chinese Medicine safe to take with western medicine?

David or your health care provider will need to review your medications before considering the use of any herbal medicine.

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Is Acupuncture painful?

Generally the most common sensation is a dull ache. If you’re afraid of needles, David has a range of non-needle techniques he uses.

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What does an initial assessment involve?

In the health assessment. David assesses your major complaints and goals. This session allows you to ask questions and find out if you will benefit from a health care plan.

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How do I start?

Apply for a health assessment here.

David’s schedule is filling quickly, so we recommend applying now to avoid going onto his waiting list.

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